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  • Lumbar and Cervical Vignettes

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Instructional Streaming Video

    Access the complete set of videos used in the SIS Bio-Skills Labs when you purchase SIS’s Lumbar and Cervical Vignettes. This is your only opportunity to learn directly from one of SIS’s founders, master interventional specialist Dr. Charles Aprill himself, as he demonstrates SIS Guidelines-based procedures on cadavers.


    Lumbar Vignettes:

    • Caudal Epidural Injections
    • Sacroiliac Joint Injections
    • S1 Transforaminal Epidural Injections
    • L5/S1 Disc Access
    • L5 Transforaminal Epidural Injections
    • L5 Dorsal Ramus Blocks
    • L4/5 Facet Joint Injections
    • L4/5 Interlaminar Epidural Injections
    • L4 Medial Branch Blocks
    • L3/4 Disc Access
    • L3 Transforaminal Epidural Injections

    Cervical Vignettes:

    • C7/T1 Facet Joint Injections
    • C7/T1 Interlaminar Epidural Injections
    • C7 Medial Branch Blocks
    • C7 Sympathetic Blocks
    • C6/7 and C5/6 Transforaminal Epidural Injections
    • C6/7, C5/6, and C4/5 Disc Access
    • C4/5/6 Medial Branch Blocks
    • C3 Medial Branch and Third Occipital Nerve Blocks
    • C1/2 Lateral Atlanto-Axial Joint Injections

    View a free, three-minute preview.

  • MRI Investigation of Genicular Neurotomy Anatomy

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study examining the genicular neurotomy of the knee: MRI characterization of T anatomy and implications for intervention. The paper, Investigation of genicular neurotomy of the knee: MRI characterization of T anatomy and implications for intervention, was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Drs. Anthony Schwarzer and Vance Lehman. 

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act

    Educational Objectives
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principles to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Anthony Schwarzer, MB BS, PhD
    Nothing to disclose

    Vance Lehman
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Anthony Schwarzer, MB BS, PhD
    Stock ownership: Ramsay Health and CSL

    Vance Lehman
    Nothing to disclose

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release: 
    6/23/2020 
    Date of Activity Expiration: 6/24/2022

  • Predictors of Pain Recurrence After Lumbar Facet Joint Injections

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study examining the predictors of pain recurrence after lumbar facet joint injections. The paper, Campos, W.K. et al. Predictors of Pain Recurrence After Lumbar Facet Injections, was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Drs. Joe Lee and Nathaniel M. Schuster.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Educational Objectives Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principles to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Joe Lee, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    Nathaniel M. Schuster, MD
    Speaker: Eli Lilly and Co. (future)
    Grant support: Eli Lilly and Co. (non-monetary assistance, no direct payment received)

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Joe Lee, MD
    Position as proprietor: Joe Lee, MD, LLC
    Stock ownership: Pfizer, TRowe Price Health Sciences Fund
    Consultant: Advanced Medical Reviews, Prium, Consultant Veteran Evaluation Services, Consultant Dane Street
    Travel Expenses: Veteran Evaluation Services 

    Nathaniel M. Schuster, MD
    Stock ownership: NociMeter
    Any position in physician society/association: SIS, AAPM, AAN/AHS, NANS, ASRN, Pain Medicine Journal

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release:
     6/23/2020 
    Date of Activity Expiration: 6/24/2022

  • Opioid Use and Spinal Cord Stimulation

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study examining adverse events after spinal cord stimulator placement or revision in patients whose anticoagulants had been held. The paper, Safety of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients Who Routinely Use Anticoagulants, was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Joe Lee, MD and W. Jeremy Beckworth, MD.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Copyright
    Materials presented in this activity have been made available by the Spine Intervention Society for educational purposes only. We reserve all rights to such material.

    Educational Objectives Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Identify best practices to ensure patient safety during interventional spine procedures
    • Cite the evidentiary basis for risk mitigation strategies in the safe performance of interventional pain procedures

    Author Disclosures Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Dermot Maher, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    Fahad Khan, MD

    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Dermot Maher, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    Fahad Khan, MD

    Nothing to disclose

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Date of Activity Release: 7
    /31/2018
    Date of Activity Expiration: 7/30/2021

  • What Injectate Volume is Sufficient for Cervical Medial Branch Blocks?

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study examining the spread and volume of injectate required for a valid cervical medial branch block (MBB). The paper, Cervical Medial Branch Block Volume Dependent Dispersion Patterns as a Predictor for Ablation Success: A Cadaveric Study by Wahezi SE et al., was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Drs. Anthony Schwarzer and Byron Schneider.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Copyright
    Materials presented in this activity have been made available by the Spine Intervention Society for educational purposes only. We reserve all rights to such material.

    Educational Objectives
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principles to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Anthony Schwarzer, MB BS, PhD
    Nothing to disclose

    Byron Schneider, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Anthony Schwarzer, MB BS, PhD
    Stock ownership: Ramsay Health, CSL

    Byron Schneider, MD
    Consultant: AIM Specialty Health, State Farm
    Advisory committees:
    AIM Specialty Health, MACRA
    Position in physician society/association: AAPM&R, NASS, SIS, AAP
    Travel expenses: NASS, SIS

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release:
     4/30/2019
    Date of Activity Expiration: 4/29/2022

  • The Impact of Duloxetine on Spinal Cord Stimulation Outcomes for Chronic Pain

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study assessing the impact of duloxetine on the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation. The paper, Duloxetine Improves Spinal Cord Stimulation Outcomes for Chronic Pain, was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Dermot P. Maher, MD, MS, and Yi Zhang, MD, PhD.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes" Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Copyright
    Materials presented in this activity have been made available by the Spine Intervention Society for educational purposes only. We reserve all rights to such material.

    Educational Objectives
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principle to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information 
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Demot P. Maher, MD, MS
    Nothing to disclose

    Yi Zhang, MD, PhD
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Demot P. Maher, MD, MS
    Nothing to disclose

    Yi Zhang, MD, PhD
    Nothing to disclose

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release: 7/17/2019
    Date of Activity Expiration: 7/16/2022

  • Systemic Reactions to Spinal Injections

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study that aimed to characterize the incidence of systemic reactions to epidural and facet injections of steroid. The paper, The Incidence of Various Types of Systemic Reactions Related to Epidural Steroid Injections: A Prospective Observational Study by Lee GY, Lee JW, Yeom JS, Kim KJ, Shin HI, Kang HS, was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Drs. W. Jeremy Beckworth and Joe Lee.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Educational Objectives
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principles to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    W. Jeremy Beckworth, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    Joe Lee, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    W. Jeremy Beckworth, MD
    Grant support: Mesoblast

    Joe Lee, MD
    Stock ownership: Pfizer, mutual funds
    Consultant: Prium, Advanced Medical Reviews, Veterans Evaluation Services, Redlink
    Expert witness: Prium
    Position in physician society/association: SIS
    Travel expenses: Veteran Evaluation

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release: 
    7/9/2018
    Date of Activity Expiration: 7/8/2021

  • Safety of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients Who Routinely Use Anticoagulants

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study examining adverse events after spinal cord stimulator placement or revision in patients whose anticoagulants had been held. The paper, Safety of Spinal Cord Stimulation in Patients Who Routinely Use Anticoagulants, was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Joe Lee, MD and W. Jeremy Beckworth, MD.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Copyright
    Materials presented in this activity have been made available by the Spine Intervention Society for educational purposes only. We reserve all rights to such material.

    Educational Objectives
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principles to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information 
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Joe Lee, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    W. Jeremy Beckworth, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Joe Lee, MD
    Stock ownership: Pfizer, mutual funds
    Consultant: Prium, Advanced Medical Reviews, Veterans Evaluation Services, Redlink
    Expert witness: Prium
    Position in physician society/association: SIS
    Travel expenses: Veteran Evaluation 

    W. Jeremy Beckworth, MD
    Grant support: Mesoblast

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release:
    12/3/2018
    Date of Activity Expiration:12/2/2021

  • Retrospective Look at the Effectiveness of Transforaminal or Interlaminar ESIs of Particulate Steroid

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzes the methodology and findings of a study that examined treatment outcomes for patients with lumbar disc herniation who were treated with either interlaminar or transforaminal epidural steroid injections of particulate corticosteroid. The paper, Comparison of Treatment Outcomes in Lumbar Disc Herniation Patients Treated with Epidural Steroid Injections: Interlaminar Versus Transforaminal Approachby Bensler S. et al. was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Drs. Yi Zhang and Dermot P. Maher.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Copyright
    Materials presented in this activity have been made available by the Spine Intervention Society for educational purposes only. We reserve all rights to such material.

    Educational Objectives 
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principles to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Yi Zhang, MD, PhD
    Nothing to disclose

    Dermot P. Maher, MD, MS
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Yi Zhang, MD, PhD
    Nothing to disclose

    Dermot P. Maher, MD, MS
    Nothing to disclose

    Accreditation Statement
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
     
    commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release: 
    1/6/2020
    Date of Activity Expiration: 1/5/2023

  • Varying SCS Frequency for Patients with Low Back Pain

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Online Journal Club CME

    Review the journal article and evidentiary table that analyzed spinal cord stimulation and the effects of varying frequency on sham effect and placebo response. The paper, Prospective, Randomized, Sham-Control, Double Blind, Crossover Trial of Subthreshold Spinal Cord Stimulation at Various Kilohertz Frequencies in Subjects Suffering From Failed Back Surgery Syndrome (SCS Frequency Study), was critically reviewed by SIS Research Division members Nathaniel M. Schuster, MD and Byron J. Schneider, MD.

    Once you review the article and evidentiary table, you will be asked to complete a quiz to earn continuing medical education (CME) credits.

    Fair Use Disclaimer 
    This article is made available for the purpose of this online continuing medical education activity under the fair use doctrine of copyright law, which allows that the use of a copyrighted work “for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright” and factors to consider are “the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes” Section 107 of the Copyright Act.

    Copyright
    Materials presented in this activity have been made available by the Spine Intervention Society for educational purposes only. We reserve all rights to such material.

    Educational Objectives
    Upon completion of this activity, participants should be able to:

    • Examine emerging literature to mitigate risks and to practice spine interventions safely and best protect patients
    • Discuss the application of evidence-based medicine principle to recent research findings
    • Apply research findings to the practice of ethical, evidence-based interventional spine care

    Research Division Reviewers Disclosure Information
    RELEVANT FINANCIAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH ACCME DEFINED COMMERCIAL INTERESTS
    Nathaniel M. Schuster, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    Byron J. Schneider, MD
    Nothing to disclose

    OTHER DISCLOSURES
    Nathaniel M. Schuster, MD
    Medical advisor: Karuna Labs
    Grant support: Eli Lilly, Migraine Research Foundation, Association of Migraine Disorders, American Association of Orofacial Pain

    Bryon J. Schneider, MD
    Consultant: Professional Disabilities Associates
    Advisory committee: Tennessee Advisory Group - Spine Episodes of Care
    Position in physician society/association: NASS, SIS
    Travel expenses: NASS, SIS

    Accreditation Statement
     
    The Spine Intervention Society (SIS) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    Credit Designation Statement 
    SIS designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    Commercial Support
    No commercial support was received for this activity.

    Date of Activity Release: 9/4/2018 
    Date of Activity Expiration: 9/3/2021